Presenter Information

Cameron AndersonFollow

Start Date

17-11-2017 10:00 AM

End Date

17-11-2017 11:30 AM

Description

Background: Measles, Mumps, and Rubella (MMR) are diseases that can be vaccinated against but have had a recent increase in incidence. The vaccination is not mandatory allowing parents to decide whether or not to vaccinate their child. Health decision-making is multifaceted including many sources of information and factors that surround it. This complicates the decision making especially regarding the MMR vaccination.

Objectives: This integrative literature review explored the factors and appraisal that parents conduct to make an informed decision regarding the MMR vaccination for their child.

Methods: A search from CINAHL Complete and PsychINFO, where the terms vaccination, decision making, and MMR were used, yielded 15 unique articles after exclusion criteria was applied. Articles were evaluated and the Health Belief Model was used to identify factors that effect decision-making

Results: Main themes that were drawn from the literature include general safety concerns, risks of the disease, individualized factors of the child, and many aspects surrounding healthcare professionals. These factors are both negative causing a rejection of the vaccine and positive causing engagement depending on the parents’ interpretation.

Conclusion: The most prevalent factor for influencing a parents’ view on the MMR vaccination involves the healthcare provider and the relationship that is formed. When a trusting relationship is formed with a child-centered focus parents have more intention to vaccinate their child. Socioeconomic status and education have an inverse relationship with vaccine intentions indicating that an increase in recourses provides a more vaccine critical view. Acknowledging this information can make healthcare professionals aware of their personal influence on this decision. Future research should be aimed at linking the factors that influence decisions with the actual vaccine uptake rates to better understand this association.

Keywords: Vaccination, MMR, Decision Making, Appraisal

Included in

Nursing Commons

Share

COinS
 
Nov 17th, 10:00 AM Nov 17th, 11:30 AM

Factors Effecting Parental Decision-making in Measles, Mumps, and Rubella Vaccine Determination: An Integrative Review of the Literature

Background: Measles, Mumps, and Rubella (MMR) are diseases that can be vaccinated against but have had a recent increase in incidence. The vaccination is not mandatory allowing parents to decide whether or not to vaccinate their child. Health decision-making is multifaceted including many sources of information and factors that surround it. This complicates the decision making especially regarding the MMR vaccination.

Objectives: This integrative literature review explored the factors and appraisal that parents conduct to make an informed decision regarding the MMR vaccination for their child.

Methods: A search from CINAHL Complete and PsychINFO, where the terms vaccination, decision making, and MMR were used, yielded 15 unique articles after exclusion criteria was applied. Articles were evaluated and the Health Belief Model was used to identify factors that effect decision-making

Results: Main themes that were drawn from the literature include general safety concerns, risks of the disease, individualized factors of the child, and many aspects surrounding healthcare professionals. These factors are both negative causing a rejection of the vaccine and positive causing engagement depending on the parents’ interpretation.

Conclusion: The most prevalent factor for influencing a parents’ view on the MMR vaccination involves the healthcare provider and the relationship that is formed. When a trusting relationship is formed with a child-centered focus parents have more intention to vaccinate their child. Socioeconomic status and education have an inverse relationship with vaccine intentions indicating that an increase in recourses provides a more vaccine critical view. Acknowledging this information can make healthcare professionals aware of their personal influence on this decision. Future research should be aimed at linking the factors that influence decisions with the actual vaccine uptake rates to better understand this association.

Keywords: Vaccination, MMR, Decision Making, Appraisal

 

To view the content in your browser, please download Adobe Reader or, alternately,
you may Download the file to your hard drive.

NOTE: The latest versions of Adobe Reader do not support viewing PDF files within Firefox on Mac OS and if you are using a modern (Intel) Mac, there is no official plugin for viewing PDF files within the browser window.