College of Liberal Arts & Social Sciences Theses and Dissertations

Graduation Date

12-2010

Document Type

Thesis

College/Department Conferring Degree

International Studies

Keywords

transnational feminism, gender-based violence, V-Day, Eve Ensler, intersectionality

Abstract

This project explores the prevalence of gender-based violence around the globe, along with the ways in which women and groups are locally, nationally and globally collaborating to resist violence and provide opportunities for survivors to heal. Utilizing feminist theoretical approaches to understanding gender-based violence and cross-cultural organizing as a framework, I examine V-Day and the ways in which it has incorporated feminist practices, specfically transnational feminist practices, into its philosophy as well as its style of organizing and activism. Close attention is paid to understanding transnational feminism, intersectionality and diversity within feminisms, body-centered and empowerment approaches to healing trauma, as well as engaging men as allies in the movement. Finally, the paper explores the future of V-Day, suggesting more consistent integration of transnational and intersectional feminist analysis, taking a preventative, proactive approach to ending violence, and making space for more localized interpretations of The Vagina Monologues and thoughtfully engaging voices of dissent and debate within V-Day.

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